Marketwired Blog

Why do we call it soccer anyway?



When British soccer sensation David Beckham arrived in America in 2007 to play for the Los Angeles Galaxy, he had to correct himself after dropping the proverbial ball with the name of his beloved sport.  Beckham made a mistake by calling his sport “football.”  He then said, “Excuse me… soccer.” Even he was confused as to what to call it in the US.

Unfortunately, Beckham likely will not play in the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, thanks to an untimely Achilles tendon injury he suffered last weekend.  But as sports fans everywhere tune in to the matches, some in the US might be wondering why they keep calling it football.

The British invented football, but why do we (North Americans) call it soccer?  It seems as if every other country in the world, people call the sport “football.”  For those of us in the US and Canada, that’s a totally different sport, played with a different ball.  Some online sites that explain the history of the sport in Canada say Canadians call it soccer just to be able to communicate with their neighbors to the south (thanks!—so it’s the Americans’ fault).

Seems that the word “soccer” is actually the evolved contraction for “Association Football.”  The term was butchered and evolved into “assoc’er” and eventually “soc’er” to what we know today in North America as soccer.  Thus, the nickname soccer was born.

No matter where you are and what you call it, fans everywhere are gearing up for the FIFA World Cup 2010 in South Africa — the first on the African continent.  Marketwire’s South Africa Soccer Newsline (promoted as South Africa Football Newsline in the UK) is designed to reach more than 20,000 media organizations around the world, targeting sports writers and trade publications covering the historic event.  You need not follow soccer or have operations in South Africa to take advantage of this unique newsline.  This is a great opportunity to make announcements related to emerging markets, corporate social responsibility and expansion plans in Africa.  It’s even a great avenue for non-governmental organizations to announce initiatives in developing nations.

The fact that David Beckham won’t  participate in the World Cup and his adoring (female) fans won’t have a chance to see him in action is a major disappointment for enthusiasts of the sport, and a blow to the soccer star himself — he would have been the first English player to participate in four consecutive World Cups.

To find out more about the South Africa Soccer/Football Newsline, contact your local Marketwire office.


Related posts:



Tags: ,

5 Comments on Why do we call it soccer anyway?

Nick Shin said : Guest Report 7 years ago

Thanks, we try to keep the blog interesting, relevant, and helpful.I've learned more about the history of soccer/football than I ever had. You can also call American Football, gridiron football, if you wish. Great info though, saved me from having to Google the history.Nick

Thom said : Guest Report 7 years ago

Nice post. However, I think as pertinent a question is

Nick Shin said : Guest Report 7 years ago

Thanks, we try to keep the blog interesting, relevant, and helpful.I've learned more about the history of soccer/football than I ever had. You can also call American Football, gridiron football, if you wish. Great info though, saved me from having to Google the history.Nick

Thom said : Guest Report 7 years ago

Nice blog. However, I think as pertinent a question is

uberVU - social comments said : Guest Report 7 years ago

Social comments and analytics for this post... This post was mentioned on Twitter by marketwire: Marketwire gears up for the 2010 World Cup w/new offering. Why do we call it soccer anyway? http://bit.ly/diiKPg #worldcup...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked

Featured Posts

Nasdaq to Acquire Marketwired

Marketwired is pleased to announce our agreement to be acquired by Nasdaq. In this personal message, Marketwired President and CEO ...

Read More

Reverse That PR $H#T

[By Rebekah Iliff] For decades, PR has been *relegated to a position that oft leaves us “last to know first to ...

Read More

#WPRF2016 Facebook Live Video: PR, Influencers and the Power of Relationships

[By Lisa Davis} Earlier this week, the World Public Relations Forum 2016 (#WPRF2016) wrapped up in Toronto taking with it some ...

Read More

#CreativePR: Get Out of the Media-pitching Mindset

This is post 3 of our 5-part #CreativePR blog series. Stay tuned for posts 4 and 5, which will look further into ...

Read More

PR 2020: What will it be like?

[By Jason Mollica] Victor Hugo once said that there is nothing like a dream to create the future. If you had ...

Read More



Follow Me

Public Relations Today